President: Donna Patrick

President-Elect: Martha Radice

Past-President: Michel Bouchard

Treasurer: Clint Westman

Secretary: Pauline McKenzie

Anglophone Member at Large: Eric Henry

Francophone Member at Large: Éric Gagnon Poulin

Communications Officer: Nathalie Boucher

 

List of (almost) all Executive Committee members since 1974 (PDF). Please let us know if you know the missing information! 

 

 

 

President: Donna Patrick

Donna Patrick studied linguistics and anthropology at McGill University, earning her B.A. and M.A. there, and at the University of Toronto, where she received her Ph.D. She taught at Brock University from 1996 to 2003 before moving to Carleton University in 2004, where she is currently Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. Professor Patrick’s research in linguistic anthropology focuses on Indigenous and minority language politics, rights, and practices and has included work in language endangerment, language socialization, language education policy and practice, critical literacies, and social semiotics. Publications include the 2003 monograph Language, Politics, and Social Interaction in an Inuit Community and the co-edited 2004 volume, Language Rights and Language Survival, as well as articles critiquing language endangerment discourse, language policy, and conceptions of language removed from political economic contexts of language learning and use. Her most recent work involves participatory action research with Inuit in Ottawa and Montreal, and explores Inuit identities, literacies, and the construction of place in transnational contexts through the semiotics of objects, food, and language. 

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President-Elect: Martha Radice

Martha Radice is a social anthropologist whose work focuses on the social, spatial and cultural dynamics of cities. She is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology of Dalhousie University, Halifax. She has investigated social relations, especially interethnic relations, and the production of space in multiethnic commercial streets in Montréal. Her ongoing areas of interest are urban anthropology, public space, public art and public culture, multiculturalism and cosmopolitanism, neighbourhoods, and ethnographic methods. She has also been involved in applied research, having evaluated social inclusion in high schools and police-community relations in the UK and looked at public libraries as public space in Canada. 

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Past-president: Michel Bouchard

Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Northern British Columbia, Dr. Bouchard received his Ph.D. from the University of Alberta. My main areas of expertise include the Russian-speaking Diaspora, the Russian Federation and its constituent populations, nationalism and ethnicity, identity and belonging and French North America. At the outset, the research I conducted took for granted the recent invention of nations. However, as new lines of inquiry emerge, I have proposed a new theoretical framework for understanding nationhood and other forms of community, proposing that nations are not invented or constructed in modernity, but rather continually curated and the origins of nationhood can be traced back to the Middle-Ages and earlier. Rather than accepting the easy premise that states create nations, I am proposing that other institutions are equally (if not more) important than states in the emergence of national communities. This would include the role of museums and the writing of history as well as popular culture as helping to shape and affirm ideas of nationhood. Currently, I am completing research on the history of Canadien (aka French-Canadian), Métis and Iroquois French-speakers in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. My interest centers on the forgotten peoples of history and how anthropologists can analyze history to better understand the present.

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Treasurer: Clint Westman

Clint Westman is an environmental anthropologist and is Associate Professor in the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Saskatchewan. He received his doctorate in Socio-Cultural Anthropology from the University of Alberta, Department of Anthropology, in 2008 and completed postdoctoral research in Ethnologie at Université de Montréal, Département d’anthropologie, in 2008-9. His work among Cree and Métis communities of northern Alberta since 1996 has touched on politics, history, religion, and environment. His current community-engaged ethnographic research is focused on human-animal relations, impacts and benefits of the energy industry and its consultation processes, and on religious pluralism in contemporary communities.

Contact Clint Westman at the address written here

   

Secretary: Pauline McKenzie

Pauline McKenzie Aucoin is a Research Associate at the Simone de Beauvoir Institute in Montreal, and has a PhD from the University of Toronto. Her research has focussed on gender stratification, sound symbolism, the politics of knowledge, and the organization of space as a practice of power in Fijian society where spatial order reflects status differences for both gender and rank. Her current research examines the naturalist aesthetic of the Picturesque garden in Europe in order to investigate how this spatial order articulated with Rousseau's ideals, and through 18th C writing and landscape art came to formulate a political philosophy for place, politics and the social imaginary of nature. Pauline is also involved with a curriculum development project at the University of Ottawa that helps to design indigenous language and science teaching materials for an Algonquin language immersion program.

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Anglophone Member at Large: Eric Henry

Eric Henry is a linguistic anthropologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He holds a Master’s degree in social anthropology from the University of Oxford and a PhD in anthropology from Cornell University. His research describes the emerging role of global languages, most notably English, in China. Since 2003 he has conducted fieldwork within the foreign language teaching industry in the northeastern city of Shenyang, and charts the ways that global languages, national languages and local vernaculars interact in the production of cosmopolitan identities. His teaching and research interests encompass the fields of sociolinguistics, semiotics, globalization, and language inequalities. He has also conducted archival research on missionary language educators in early 20th century Peking.

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Francophone Member at Large: Éric Gagnon Poulin

Éric Gagnon Poulin is interested in poverty and exclusion, sustainable development, social movements and resistance in Quebec and Latin America. He completed his Masters degree on Mirabel exproprieted citizen’s political mobilisation. He also produced a documentary film on the same topic that will be premiered at the 2nd International Forum on Great Useless and Imposed Projects in France. Eric also holds a multidisciplinary certificate in contemporary Latin American Studies from the Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile. He is currently completing a PhD at Laval University in economic anthropology and is particularly interested in discourse that addresses themes of poverty and social exclusion. 

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Communications Officer: Nathalie Boucher

Nathalie Boucher holds a Master's in Anthropology from Laval University and a PhD in Urban Studies from the Institute of National Scientific Research in Montreal. Her research interests lie in the area of sociability, socialization and public spaces in cities of the Pacific Rim in the neoliberal era. After carrying out a study of social interactions in the public spaces of downtown Los Angeles, she went on to investigate the social life of beaches and pools of Australia at the Centre of Excellence in Natural Resource Management of the University of Western Australia, and of the hot springs of Taipei at the Chair of Taiwan Studies of the University of Ottawa. Her current work is on interactions in public baths in Taïwan as a postdoctoral fellow of the National Taiwan University. Her teaching and publications deal with qualitative methodologies, urban sociology, and anthropology of communication. She served a term as Member at Large on the CASCA executive between 2011 and 2013.

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Contact Info

Canadian Anthropology Society (CASCA)
c/o Karli Whitmore
125 rue Jean de la Londe, #301
Baie d'Urfe (Québec) H9X 3T8
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